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Frostproof, Florida

Dominion of British West Florida

Are the Gulf States actually part of the British Commonwealth? 

Certainly, the British government used to control the thirteen original colonies, and though you may have thought that the Revolutionary War (and the War of 1812) solved that conundrum, according to some you would be wrong.

It seems that the southern sections of Mississippi, Alabama, Florida and Louisiana are technically “the Dominion of British West Florida” according to the Treaty of 1763, signed by Charles I.

In 1810, President James Madison signed the “Annexation by Proclamation” that revoked the land from the Spaniards and claimed it as American soil. There were ensuing battles, but the Spaniards were pushed from the land in 1813. The United States government paid Spain for the land, but never acknowledged that the British had some claim to the land, too. It is historically unclear if the British thought they had some claim to it either.

In 2005, the Third Restoration effort was begun on the World Wide Web (it is somewhat unclear who is behind it, though the thrust of it can be found here: http://dbwf.net/history/index.html), to petition the Queen of England to recognize British West Florida. Currently the British government refuses to acknowledge the individuals claiming to represent the Dominion, as any claim would disrupt relations between Great Britain and America.