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Timișoara, Romania

Museum of the Communist Consumer

A collection of items from a way of life that no longer exists. 

At the end of 1989, Timișoara became the first city freed from the Communist regime in Romania. Shortly after, many Romanians began throwing out items that were used in the household during the Communist era. It was out with the old, in with the new. 

Twenty-five years later, starting with a vinyl collection of old Romanian LPs and aided by word of mouth, a museum began to take shape.

Located close to the Timișoara city center, the Museum of the Communist Consumer is a collection of items that Romanians could buy during the “golden age” (as it was called by communist propaganda) that showcases a way of life that was present in every household of Communist Romania. 

The unique museum is set up like a typical apartment, where visitors can explore armoires, drawers and shelves to discover all sorts of items that were in use in Communist Romania, ranging from old TV and radio sets to kitchen amenities, bicycles and toys, school supplies and many more.

For some visitors, the memorabilia serves as a way to learn about a way of living that no longer exists. Others will remember and recognize items that used to be in their own homes. 

Know Before You Go

The museum is in an old house located close to the Nicolae Balcescu Square, reachable by tram (6 , 7 , 8 or 10) or by bus (E8). The street's former name is Zoe (changed recently to Laszlo Szekely).
The entrance is done through the upstairs bar called Scârţ Loc Lejer, where you can relax and have a taste of Romanian beer, sweets and hospitality.

Donations are still accepted, so the museum is constantly changing and has much evolved since it's opening, almost 1 year ago. The entrance to the museum is free.

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